Books by Dr. Gail Palmer

Click here to purchase Dr. Palmer's books and DVDs from Amazon.com.
Books and DVDs also are available for purchase through PayPal and retail outlets and
visitors centers in and near Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Hidden in Plain Sight:
Cemeteries of the Smoky Mountains
Vol 1 - Tennessee

 


The Midwives' Quilt:
A Tale of Conflict and Intrigue in the Smoky Mountains

Dr. Gail Palmer (left), author of The Midwives’ Quilt: A Tale of Conflict & Intrigue in the Smoky Mountains,” and Kathleen Puckett, designer show the quilt they made to represent the one the midwives worked on in “The Midwives’ Quilt.” They shared sewing of 21 individual images in the design, taking about 200 hours to complete.

The Making of a Quilt

Shown in the photograph are Dr. Gail Palmer (left), author of Midwives' Quilt:
Tales of Conflict and Intrigue in the Smoky Mountains, and Kathleen Puckett,
her partner and designer of the quilt they made to represent the
one the midwives worked on in the Midwives' Quilt.

They shared sewing of 21 individual images in the design, taking about 200 hours to complete.
It was a first effort for both women. Professional quilters at Pappy's Quilting Place, Maryville,
attached the backing and a binding around the 84-inch x 84-inch quilt.

I wanted something to display at book signings and talks to show people something similar to the quilt the four midwives in the book worked on together, each with their own skill level and creative ideas. It had to show plants and animals important to midwives and Cherokee in their healing practices, each symbol
emphasizing balance and harmony in the natural and spiritual worlds, Palmer said.

The quilt project Kathy proposed sounded perfect. Puckett designed the quilt using
techniques she uses to create her stained-glass designs.

It was important to use colors representing fire, water, earth, and sky for the four large background squares; each square includes two animal figures and three plants. A turtle in the middle represents Mother Earth in Cherokee Indian lore, Puckett said. We found photographs of plants used as remedies in the late 1800s and early 1900s and transferred those to muslin fabric; then embroidered over those images with
matching thread, creating a textured fabric version of each plant.

Both women agree is was a worthwhile project.
Both women also agree, they wouldn't do it again!

Smoky Mountain Tales:
Feuds, Murder, & Mayhem Vol 2


Smoky Mountain Tales:
Feuds, Murder, & Mayhem Vol 1

Great Smoky Mountains National Park:
In The Beginning... Fact, Legend, & Eminent Domain

PRESERVING MOUNTAIN HERITAGE
It's important to thoroughly preserve our mountain heritage.

The historical record is never static, but evolves as researchers find and interpret new information. While efforts are made to provide accurate accounting to historical records, no doubt the material published by Smoky Mountain Publishers can be continuously refined.

Therefore, your anecdotes, stories, photographs, and family history
material are welcome for use in future projects. 
E-MAIL or WRITE Dr. Palmer. Contact information is located at the
bottom of this page and on the PURCHASE page.
 


Great Smoky Mountains Historical Reference Sources 

University of Tennessee, Knoxville Library Digital Collection
National Park Service
Cades Cove Preservation Association
East Tennessee Historical Society
Great Smoky Mountains Heritage Center


Smoky Mountain Publishers
Dr. Gail Palmer
P.O. Box 684
Alcoa, TN 37701
lpalmer@utk.edu





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